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About Vincent Van Gogh Bedroom Paintings

Van Gogh Painting His Bedroom

Two video lessons on the art of Vincent van Gogh’s Painting Of His Bedroom. We learn about van Gogh’s famous Bedroom painting and the van Gogh self portrait. Enjoy both videos. It’s an opportunity to learn the hows, whys and whats of Vincent van Gogh.

Enjoy!

Jackie-Jacobson- artist

Speakers: Dr. Beth HarrisDr. Steven Zucker

Van Gogh

van Gogh “The Bedroom”

Vincent van Gogh, The Bedroom, 1889, oil on canvas, 29 x 36-5/8 inches / 73.6 x 92.3 cm (Art Institute of Chicago)

The Bedroom, 1889
Oil on canvas
29 x 36 5/8 in. (73.6 x 92.3 cm)
Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection, 1926.417
Medieval to Modern European Painting and Sculpture Gallery 241  Art Institute Chicago — Permanent collection label

 vanGogh – About “The Bedroom”

Vincent van Gogh’s three versions of this composition are the only record he made of the interior of the Yellow House. Arles in the south of France iswhere he lived.

The house embodied the artist’s dream of a “Studio of the South.” A community of like-minded artists working in harmony to create art for the future.

The first version of The Bedroom (van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam) was one of the paintings van Gogh made to decorate the house in anticipation of the arrival of his first guest, Paul Gauguin.

“It’s just simply my bedroom,” he wrote, “only here color is to do everything. To be suggestive here of rest or of sleep in general. In a word, looking at the picture ought to rest the brain, or rather the imagination.”

Gauguin’s stay at the Yellow House would be fraught with tension. After two months, van Gogh’s self-mutilation and Gauguin’s flight back to Paris ended the Studio of the South.

van Gogh made this second version of The Bedroom about a year after the first, While he was living at an asylum in Saint-Rémy.

Post-Impressionism

The work of van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne and Seurat together constitute Post-Impressionism. Yet their work is so varied and unrelated, we might never otherwise think of these four artists as a group.
 
Certainly van Gogh and Gauguin were friends and they briefly painted together. Each of these artists was concerned with solving particular issues that had to do with their own individual sensibility. Ironically, if anything ties these artists together it is this focus on subjectivity.
 
Read more intersting articles. https://jackiejacobson.com/blog/

Munch & Warhol

Edvard Munch & Andy Warhol

” The Scream and More”

” I believe every painter should paint in the style of the artists they most admire. And so…my portrait paintings of children in the Andy Warhol style. Well here it is Warhol does Munch! ~ Jackie

Painting - Jacobson

“Emma” in the style of Andy Warhol ©Jacobson

Edvard Munch & Andy Warhol :

Two Art Icons Had More In Common Than You Think

The Huffington Post | By Katherine Brooks

VIDEO – (Not in English, but see the Art Exhibit at Louisiana Museum – Denmark)

In 1984, the appropriation king, Andy Warhol, took on a modern art subject far removed from his Campbell’s Soup cans and Marilyn Monroe visages. That year he opted to reimagine the masterpieces of a certain anxiety-ridden Norwegian painter by the name of Edvard Munch.

Warhol tackled four of Munch’s iconic themes — “The Scream,” “Madonna,” “Self-Portrait” and “The Brooch.Eva Mudocci” — adding his signature neon color palette and fluid, screen printed lines to a host of already recognizable images. From the bald, bellowing creature Munch positioned on a fjord in the 1890s to the painter’s sensual depiction of what some art historians claim is the Virgin Mary, Warhol twisted and highlighted Munch’s symbolic figures until they were his own.

Andy Warhol

 

 

 

Warhol: © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
A recently published book, based on a past exhibition at New York’s Scandinavia House, puts Warhol’s reinterpretations on display, sitting pretty next to the original Munch artworks that inspired them. Titled “Munch/Warhol and the Multiple Image,” it brings attention not only to Warhol’s era of Munch-ian fascination, but also to the very apparent similarities between the two emotionally charged artists. While Munch is considered to have been a recluse and tortured soul, and Warhol remembered as a serial co-dependent and fame monger, both men proved to have more than a penchant for the repeated image.

 

 

 

“Even though Warhol offered himself up as all surface, and Munch, all impenetrable depth, this exhibition finds many similarities in the ways in which the two artists built their careers by carefully controlling their public personas and artistic production,” remarked Dr. Patricia G. Berman, professor of art history at Wellesley College and the University of Oslo, in an essay for the book. “Far from being an isolate, Munch was very much in control of his career, demanding and winning the right to sequence his works in exhibition and keeping hold of the reins on the selling of his art.”

Andy Warhol

 

 

 

Warhol: © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
It’s true that Munch produced four versions of his uber-famous “Scream,” and painstakingly oscillated between painting, lithographs and printmaking to reproduce the same image. It’s not much different from the art-making processes of Warhol, who screen printed 50 versions of Ms. Monroe alone, for just one diptych. Perhaps Warhol, famous for questioning, “Isn’t life a series of images that change as they repeat themselves?,” owes more to Munch than we thought.

 

 

 

Scroll through the images below for a peek at “Munch/Warhol.” For more, check out the entire book, available online at Artbook as well as through the Scandinavia House shop.

Andy Warhol

 

 

 

Warhol: © 2013 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
 

 

 

munch

 

 

 

Munch: © 2013 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
 

 

 

 

munch

 

 

 

Munch: © 2013 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
munch
Munch: © 2013 The Munch Museum / The Munch-Ellingsen Group / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
 

 

 

 

warhol

 

 

 

Installation shot, Scandinavia House.
munch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installation shot, Scandinavia House.
 

 

 

 

munch

 

 

 

Installation shot, Scandinavia House.
 

 

 

 

 

 

CHUCK CLOSE II

Chuck Close 

Artist  ” In His Own Words “

(CBS News) Chuck Close is one of America’s greatest painters, but he has faced tremendous hurdles throughout his life and career, including suffering from face blindness and a blood clot that left him paralyzed over twenty years ago.

Chuck Close on the Art Blog :

As part of the “CBS This Morning” Note to Self series, Chuck Close wrote a note to himself at age 14. Watch the “CBS This Morning” video above and read Close’s Note to Self below:

I was in the eighth grade and was told not to even think about going to college. I couldn’t add or subtract, never could memorize the multiplication tables, was advised against taking algebra, geometry, physics or chemistry and therefore would not get into any regular college. Since I was good with my hands I was advised to aim for trade school perhaps “body and fender” work.

Never let anyone define what you are capable of by using parameters that don’t apply to you. I applied to a junior college in my hometown with “open enrollment”, got in and embarked on a career in the visual arts. Virtually everything I’ve done is influenced by my learning disabilities. I think I was driven to paint portraits to commit images of friends and family to memory. I have face blindness and once a face is flattened out I can remember it better.

“Inspiration is for amateurs — the rest of us just show up and get to work. Every great idea I’ve ever had grew out of work itself.”

BEST KNOWN FOR

Chuck Close is noted for his highly inventive techniques used to paint the human face. He rose to fame in the late 1960s for his large-scale, photo-realist portraits.

 

Chuck Close - Artist

Chuck Close – Phil (2011-12) – work & detail

QUICK FACTS

  • NAME: Chuck Close
  • OCCUPATION: EducatorPainter
  • BIRTH DATE: July 051940 (Age: 72)
  • EDUCATION: University of Washington School of Art, Yale University School of Art and Architecture
  • PLACE OF BIRTH: Monroe, Washington
  • FULL NAME: Charles Thomas Close
  • AKA: Chuck Close
  • ZODIAC SIGN: Cancer

Early Life

Charles Thomas Close was born July 5, 1940, in Monroe, Washington. The son of artistic parents who showed great support of their boy’s early creative interests, Close, who suffers from severe dyslexia, struggled in almost all phases of schoolwork except art. He was not terribly popular in school, and his problems were furthered by a neuromuscular condition that prevented him from playing sports.

For the first decade of his life, Close’s childhood was more or less stable. But when he was 11, tragedy struck, when his father died and his mother fell ill with breast cancer. Close’s own health took a terrible turn around this time as well, when a kidney infection landed him in bed for almost a year.

Through all of this, however, Close deepened his love for painting and art in general. At the age of 14, he saw an exhibition of Jackson Pollack paintings. Pollack’s style and flair had a great impact on Close, and, as he later recounted, it made him determined to become an artist.

Close eventually enrolled at the University of Washington, graduating in 1962 and immediately heading east to Yale to study for a Master of Fine Arts from the university’s Art and Architecture School.

Steeped heavy in the abstract world, Close radically changed his focus at Yale, opting for what would become his signature style: photo-realism. Using a process he came to describe as “knitting,” Close created large-format Polaroids of models that he then recreated on large canvases.

This early work was bold, intimate and up-front, replicating the particular details of his selected faces. In addition, his pieces blurred the distinction between painting and photography in a way that had never been done before. His techniques too were noteworthy, in particular his application of color, which helped pave the way for the development of the inkjet printer.

By the late 1960s, Close and his photo-realist pieces were entrenched in the New York City art scene. One of his best-known subjects from that period was of another young artistic talent, composer Philip Glass, whose portrait Close painted and showed in 1969. It has since gone on to become one of his most recognized pieces. He later painted choreographer Merce Cunningham and former President Bill Clinton, among others.

By the 1970s, Close’s work was shown in the world’s finest galleries, and he was widely considered one of America’s best contemporary artists.

QUOTES by CHUCK CLOSE

Chuck Close

Chuck Close

“I am confident that no artist has more pleasure day in and day out from what he or she does than I do.”

“I think most paintings are a record of the decisions that the artist made. I just perhaps make them a little clearer than some people have.”

“Quadriplegics don’t envy the able bodied – we envy paraplegics. We think they’ve got an easier row to hoe. There is always someone worse

off than you.”

– Chuck Close

 

Thanks for watching. What one word described Chuck Close for you? My word is BRAVE.  Please leave YOUR WORD in the comment section below. See you next time on the Art Blog.

 

artist - Jackie Jacobson

 

 

 

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Georgia O’Keeffe

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE

NEW YORK CITY PAINTINGS

Georgia O’Keeffe – my inspiration. Well here are the New York City paintings.

Once again she’s got me. I really long to live among these skyscrapers, and here I am in the desert. She did both!

How fortunate to have this video : to see her and hear her describe some of her life experiences. Enjoy with me!

artist - Jackie Jacobson

NEW YORK CITY

Enthralled by the barren landscape and expansive skies of the desert, Georgia O’Keefe would become chiefly known for paintings of flowers, rocks, shells, animal bones, and the quiet beauty of open skies and sun-drenched terrains. Yet, it is her paintings of New York city done in the 1920?s that have always captured my imagination and linger in memory.

The drama and excitement of the modern metropolis at that time in history was unmistakable, embodied in landmark skyscrapers like the American Radiator Building located at West 40th Street, in midtown Manhattan. Designed by Raymond Hood, the combined Gothic and modern styles in the design of the Radiator Building was massive, solid, and illustrious, an engineering feat of wonder erected to match the prosperity of the period.

Black brick on the frontage of the building (symbolizing coal) was prominently featured while other parts of the facade were covered in gold bricks (symbolizing fire). The entry was decorated with marble and black mirrors in a style reminiscent of an Ayn Rand dream. Ornamented and sculptured, it was an edifice of opulence, particularly after dark when the upper floors were illuminated with floodlights.

It was this vision of that building at night in the changing skyline of New York that Georgia O’Keeffe captured in her wonderfully theatrical interpretation, “Radiator Building at Night.” Painted from her window on the thirtieth floor of the Shelton Hotel (some scholars dispute that, claiming it was the 28th floor penthouse) at 49th and Lexington, that she shared with her husband, the photographer Alfred Stieglitz, she detailed flooded lights illuminating the sky at right, and at left, a bright red marquee ablaze with the name “Stieglitz” in its glow.

Georgia O’Keeffe painting of the Radiator in 1927 (the same year as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, tellingly) is remarkable for its color and for the depiction of the artificial light of the city night – the purple/blue tints of floodlights and the fluorescent whites of the office towers. There’s a touch of warm incandescence in windows here and there. The stylized smoky steam arising from the building at the right echoes the flipped curved cornices of the Radiator’s top floors. It’s pure theater.

City Night, 1926

Georgia O'Keeffe - Paintings

Georgia O’Keeffe – New York City – Paintings

The importance of the skyscraper at the time cannot be overlooked; it was considered a distinctly American “thing,” signifying symbols of modern technology. How it was to be represented in an accurate and aesthetically pleasing way became a challenge to photographers and painters alike in the New York art world. For artists like Charles Demuth and Charles Sheeler, for example, the mystique of the skyscraper was so great, it ultimately, became their muse.

Europeans visiting New York were equally fascinated with the architectural feats. “The appeal America exercised as the ideological reflection of anything inadmissible in ancient regime Europe” was possible because “America was free, it was unlimited in space, it abounded in natural resources and in money. It knew no tradition, it had no history.”

During those early years in New York, Georgia O’Keeffe grew to know the many early American modernists who were part of Stieglitz’s circle of friends, including Demuth, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, Paul Strand and Edward Steichen. Strand’s photography, as well as that of Stieglitz and his many photographer friends, was instrumental in inspiring O’Keefe’s work (as evidenced below).

New York with Moon, 1925

Georgia OKeeffe  - Painting

Georgia OKeeffe – Painting “New York Moon”

While Georgia O’Keeffe’s New York paintings bear a romantic character resembling that of the Romantic movement and its fascination for glowing celestial bodies and halos in mystical colors, her urban works are most closely associated with the American art movement of the 1920?s known as Precisionism, or Cubist Realism, a combination of Cubism and Realism.

The Shelton with Sunspots, 1926

Georgia O'Keeffe - Paintings

Georgia O’Keeffe ” The Shelton with Sunspots”

Take her work entitled The Shelton with Sunspots, from 1926, for example, where the influence of romantic elements is portrayed from a photographic glare that is caused by not having a lens hood on the camera. The result is a painting in which the skyscraper appears to be a beacon of the divine, heralding the unearthly light of a deity.

Hence, many critics found mystical meaning in her work that O’Keefe, herself, eschewed, claiming she had no tolerance for such faulty interpretations. In response to those misguided dreamers, she emphatically noted:

“The things they write sound so strange and far removed from what I feel of myself. They make me seem like some strange unearthly sort of creature floating in the air – breathing in clouds for nourishment – when the truth is that I like beef steak – and like it rare at that.”

Georgia O’Keeffee was considered the premier female artist of the 20th century, a title she considered sexist.

Unusually private, O’Keeffe was rather bored by people and society, preferring to live and work in relative solitude. She was an intense, plainspoken woman who lived in the moment, focusing on the essence of things in her life as well as her art, and eliminating the superfluous.

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Hang Pictures #2

 Wall Decorating Ideas

Precise Rules for Hanging Pictures

[leadplayer_vid id=”51B5E2E6E8B6C”]
It’s not uncommon to see people who have a lot of art who don’t know how to hang it.

Yes, the Wall Art is beautiful, but the way it’s hung takes away from both the art and its surroundings.

So here’s a few simple rules. Follow them, and you’ll get oohs and ahhs from every visitor.

Hanging Pictures – Rule 1 – Aim to have a painting occupy two-thirds to three-quarters of a wall.

wall decorating

Nashville Interior Designer Beckwith Interiors

Large walls occupied by postage-stamp sized pieces result in art that loses its potential impact.

Rule 2 – Keep your art centered at eye level.

Keeping the art at this height makes it easier for the viewer to appreciate the painting.

Take into account whether you will be sitting or standing when you view a piece. This painting hangs a little lower because it’s in a dining room where it will be seen when sitting.

Rule 3 – Picture Arranging Ideas  The bottom edge of a piece should hang no higher than 6 to 12 inches above the furniture.

paintings

by New York Interior Designer Glenn Gissler Design

The idea is that the painting helps define the space. If it floats too high above furniture it will feel disconnected. If it sits lower, it will help tie together a furniture grouping. Here’s where the 57” rule applies.

 

 Rule 4 – Create a gallery wall tied together by colors, theme or materials.

Gallery -  Art

New York Interior Designer Thom Filicia Inc.

Taupe, beige and sepia tones come together to create a gallery wall that feels very integrated.

 

 Rule 5 – Make art the inspiration for the entire room. 

decorating walls

Atlanta Interior Designer Christy Dillard Kratzer

Deep brown and reds were used as a starting point to design the rest of the room, to great success.

 

START WITH THE ART FIRST

Wall decorating

Dahlia I • Rose XXX • Dahlia Bouquet © Jacobson 2013

Yes I like to start with the artwork and then create the rest of the room. But that’s not always possible, so choose art that makes you feel good in Your Room.
If you feel good with the artwork…so will your guests.

Hang Art

Hang Pictures – Eye Level • Dahlia I Painting ©Jacobson 2013

Rotate Your Art. That’s all it takes to redecorate and make your home feel new.
Think seasons and change your room by changing where the art is hanging.
When you move the art, it will look entirely new to you. And your home will feel new too.
I hope you enjoyed this article, learned something new and that you’re inspired to move around some of your art pieces.

Please leave your comment below. I love hearing your thoughts and ideas.

 

RECENT ARTICLES?

Here’s a video that got great reviews.
It’s always hard to know just how to hang those pictures
Well now you will.
How High to Hang you Artwork?

CLICK HERE  – WATCH THE VIDEO – 57” Rule

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Are You Visiting Palm Springs Soon?

What should you do on the weekend in the Palm Springs area?

  • Shop and have fun at the largest Street Fair in the area?
  • 340 Vendors
  • Arts – Crafts – and much more
  • Free Parking
  • Free Admission

Meet me at the College of the Desert Street Fair. I’m in booth #75, every Saturday and Sunday, October – May.  I do paint in the studio from June thru September. If you’re in town, please call and make an appointment to visit my at home studio. 760.831.1190  You’ll find hanging pictures and wall decorating ideas in my booth at the street fair and at my home/studio.

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Hanging Pictures

HANGING PICTURES

Wall Decorating Idea

 

 

Hanging Pictures

Today’s wall decorating idea is about hanging pictures.
For sure…most pictures are hung too high.
To perfectly enjoy your artwork or photos, here’s the rule used by art galleries and museums.
No guess work…no extra holes.

57″ is Eye Level

 

Hanging Pictures

Hanging Pictures – Eye Level

Rooms Where You Sit – Hanging Pictures

  • Living/Dining Room
  • Kitchen
  • TV Room
  • Home Office

How High should you hang pictures?

The center of the picture should be 57″ from the floor is the answer. That’s eye level

The main thing is to be consistent. Do it the same every time.

It creates balance rather than having things feels scattered.

Hanging Pictures – Step by Step – How To…

  1. Measure and lightly mark 57″ on the wall.
  2. Measure from the top of your picture to the middle (or take the height and divide by 2)
  3. Measure the top of your picture to the tightened wire (a small amount)
  4. Subtract this last amount to tell you how far above 57″ your hook should go
  5. Measure up from 57″ with this last amount and lightly mark on the wall.

There it is…the Center of all of your hanging pictures is 57″ and you are just figuring out  ” where the hook goes above it”

Not bad. That’s pretty easy.

Whether you’re hanging a single canvas or a group of framed art pieces the technique is the same.

Exception

Hanging Pictures

Hanging Pictures in Hallways

All rules have an exception.

I prefer 60″ in rooms where you’ll see the art when STANDING, such as hallways and  bathroom, .

So the same rule applies, just change your number from 57″ to 60″

Time to Hang or Rehang Your Pictures

Now get out that tape measure and hammer.

Have fun hanging pictures so that both you and your guests will say WOW…that’s a great picture!

It’s all about pictures. Col

GREAT ARTICLES

Did you miss any of these? Catch up now…

Edvard Munch

Fashion Illustration 

Emerald – color of 2013

Photographic Art Fair – Paris Photo Los Angeles

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Are You Visiting Palm Springs Soon?

What should you do on the weekend in the Palm Springs area?

  • Shop and have fun at the largest Street Fair in the area?
  • 340 Vendors
  • Arts – Crafts – and much more
  • Free Parking
  • Free Admission

Meet me at the College of the Desert Street Fair. I’m in booth #75, every Saturday and Sunday, October – May.

 

 

 

Georgia Okeeffe

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE

NEW YORK CITY PAINTINGS

 

NEW YORK CITY

Enthralled by the barren landscape and expansive skies of the desert, Georgia O’Keefe would become chiefly known for paintings of flowers, rocks, shells, animal bones, and the quiet beauty of open skies and sun-drenched terrains. Yet, it is her paintings of New York city done in the 1920?s that have always captured my imagination and linger in memory.

The drama and excitement of the modern metropolis at that time in history was unmistakable, embodied in landmark skyscrapers like the American Radiator Building located at West 40th Street, in midtown Manhattan. Designed by Raymond Hood, the combined Gothic and modern styles in the design of the Radiator Building was massive, solid, and illustrious, an engineering feat of wonder erected to match the prosperity of the period.

Black brick on the frontage of the building (symbolizing coal) was prominently featured while other parts of the facade were covered in gold bricks (symbolizing fire). The entry was decorated with marble and black mirrors in a style reminiscent of an Ayn Rand dream. Ornamented and sculptured, it was an edifice of opulence, particularly after dark when the upper floors were illuminated with floodlights.

It was this vision of that building at night in the changing skyline of New York that Georgia O’Keeffe captured in her wonderfully theatrical interpretation, “Radiator Building at Night.” Painted from her window on the thirtieth floor of the Shelton Hotel (some scholars dispute that, claiming it was the 28th floor penthouse) at 49th and Lexington, that she shared with her husband, the photographer Alfred Stieglitz, she detailed flooded lights illuminating the sky at right, and at left, a bright red marquee ablaze with the name “Stieglitz” in its glow.

Georgia O’Keeffe painting of the Radiator in 1927 (the same year as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, tellingly) is remarkable for its color and for the depiction of the artificial light of the city night – the purple/blue tints of floodlights and the fluorescent whites of the office towers. There’s a touch of warm incandescence in windows here and there. The stylized smoky steam arising from the building at the right echoes the flipped curved cornices of the Radiator’s top floors. It’s pure theater.

Matisse – Chapelle

ENRI MATISSE

CHAPELLE DU ROSAIRE DES DOMINICANES DE VENCE

Continuing with the weeks focus on Chapels… from a Master of Color… the Light of Faith. A visit to Vence and the Henri Matisse Chapel. In this video we learn about Matisse and the Chapel project.

Enjoy!

artist - Jackie Jacobson

Article
By E.A. CARMEAN JR.

Matisse - Chepelle du Rosaire de Vence

 

The chapel is arguably the greatest religious art and architecture project of the 20th century.

Jesus’ Parable of the Mustard Seed, with its imagery of a seed growing into a plant big enough for birds to perch in, is often seen as foretelling the growth of Christianity. Arguably the greatest religious art and architecture project of the 20th century, Henri Matisse’s Chapel of the Rosary, provides another reading.

While recovering his health in 1943, Matisse had hired a young nurse who four years later became a novitiate in the Dominican Sisters of Monteil.

Once, Sister Jacque-Marie mentioned to Matisse her order’s dream of a new chapel. Four years later, the Chapelle du Rosaire des Dominicaines de Vence, perched above the French Mediterranean coast, was consecrated by the local bishop. In a statement read at the occasion, Matisse wrote, “I consider it my masterpiece.”

Planned principally for the sisters’ daily prayers, the chapel is modest. Yet it is replete with Matisse’s glorious creations, from the images on walls and the vestments worn by the clergy, to the altar and its liturgical objects.

Matisse - Windows Vence

Matisse’s stained-glass windows are the center and glory of the chapel.

There are two tall windows behind the altar, and another set of 15 windows divided into two groupings—six along the nave; nine placed behind the sisters’ stalls in an area adjacent to the sanctuary.

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THE COLOR PALETTE

For an artist long held as a master of color, the windows’ palette of only three hues—yellow, green and blue—may seem restrictive; but Matisse planned on the complementaries of red, orange and purple being cast by the filtered light’s shadows, even testing this effect in his studio.

Matisse’s colors provide a corresponding Christian iconography, with yellow a symbol of the sun and heavenly light; green of plant life and the earth; and blue of the sky, the sea and the Madonna.

The sanctuary is commanded by a towering figure of St. Dominic, the patron saint of the sisters’ order, who was said to have been given a rosary by the Madonna, thus making those prayers the center of Dominican practices. Matisse’s model was Father Couturier wearing his cowl.

The walls’ somber notes are provided by the Stations of the Cross, which Matisse placed directly opposite the altar’s Tree of Life window, perhaps acknowledging medieval texts that held that the wood of Christ’s Cross had come from the Tree of Life in Paradise.

For this Passion series, Matisse turned to Old Master paintings; for example, the Station I image of Christ before Pilate borrows from a work by the Renaissance artist Andrea Mantegna.

Matisse participated in virtually every detail of the project, creating the interconnection of elements sometimes called a church’s Holy Fabric.

His work included both the altar’s simple shapes made of a brownish, porous stone—to suggest the bread of the Eucharist—and the liturgical objects upon it: a crucifix and six candlesticks, and the tabernacle and the ciborium used to hold communion bread. Matisse also designed the vestments, planning each of the half-dozen different chasubles in one of the six church-appointed ecclesiastical colors for Seasons and Holy Days.

Before and after its June 25, 1951, consecration, Matisse’s chapel was sometimes disparaged. But praise won out. Pope Pius XII requested a set of the chasubles for the Vatican, and soon so many visitors began coming as to require restricted open hours to preserve the chapel’s—and Matisse’s—intended purpose of serving the sisters. Amusing—and telling—was the story of an English tourist asking directions to “the chapel of St. Matisse.”

As for the artist, Matisse said that “I wanted to create a spiritual space.” He did.

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Rothko Chapel

ROTHKO CHAPEL

HOUSTON TEXAS

One of my favorite places in Houston. As an institution, the Rothko Chapel functions as chapel, a museum and a forum. It is a place where religion, art, and architecture intermingle. A day of quite meditation in the Arts District in Houston.

Enjoy the experience in this video

artist - Jackie Jacobson

 

History of The Chapel

 

The Rothko Chapel was the last and one of the most important endeavors that Dominique and John de Menil, its founders, worked on together.

This modern work of religious art commissioned for Houston is comparable in importance to the Chapel of the Rosary in Vence by Henri Matisse or le Corbusier’s Chapel in Ronchamp, France.

MARK ROTHKO

Mark Rothko, one of the most influential American artists of the mid twentieth century, was commissioned by the de Menils in 1964 and given the opportunity to shape and control a total environment to encompass his work, resulting in a group of fourteen paintings created specially for the meditative space.

He worked closely with the original architect, Philip Johnson, on the plans, and then with Houston architects Howard Barnstone and Eugene Aubry who completed the building.

Since its dedication in 1971, the Rothko Chapel and Barnett Newman’s sculpture Broken Obelisk, which faces the Chapel and is dedicated to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., have achieved world recognition as examples of the greatest artistic achievements of the second half of the twentieth century.

The Rothko Chapel is free, open to the public, and accessible to the physically challenged every day of the year. It has become a pilgrimage stop for thousands of visitors who are drawn by its importance both as an artistic masterpiece and as an ecumenical gathering place for people of all religious beliefs. Students, art lovers, and scholars from all over the world visit the Chapel for research and inspiration. Modern art books and catalogues worldwide feature the Chapel.

Formal Recognition

Rothko Chapel

In 2001 the Chapel was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Chapel regularly makes top ten lists of places to visit, and is a featured entry in National Geographic’s Sacred Places of a Lifetime: 500 of the World’s Most Peaceful and Powerful Destinations, published in 2009.  Locally, the Chapel has received numerous awards, including the Peace Award from The Houston Baha’í Community (1998), a Community Award from the Museum District Business Alliance (2000), The James L. Tucker Interfaith Award from Interfaith Ministries (2004), an Urban Greenery Award from The Park People (2005), and recognitions from the Houston Peace and Justice Center (2008).

FOOTNOTE: The Rothko Painting at the Tate was vandalized.  Read more here

The Rothko Chapel, founded by Houston philanthropists John and Dominique de Menil, was dedicated in 1971 as an intimate sanctuary available to people of every belief. A tranquil meditative environment inspired by the mural canvases of Russian born American painter Mark Rothko (1903-1970), the Chapel welcomes over 60,000 visitors each year, people of every faith and from all parts of the world.  On the plaza, Barnett Newman’s majestic sculpture, Broken Obelisk, stands in memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Rothko Chapel is an independent institution, a sacred place open to all people, every day.  In 2011 the Chapel celebrated its fortieth anniversary, having achieved, in those years, recognition as one of the greatest artistic achievements of the second half of the twentieth century.  In 2001 the Chapel was listed in the National Register of Historic Places, an honor awarded before the institution was fifty years old. The Chapel regularly makes top ten lists of places to visit, and is a featured entry in National Geographic’s book Sacred Places of a Lifetime: 500 of the World’s Most Peaceful and Powerful Destinations, published in 2009.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Rothko Chapel is to inspire people to action through art and contemplation, to nurture reverence for the highest aspirations of humanity, and to provide a forum for global concerns.

What Mark Rothko Thinks About Modern Art and People

https://youtu.be/EI29ye41gYs

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