Northern Lights  

Spectacular Norway • Aurora Borealis


March 21, 2012—Multicolored curtains of light fill the skies over northern Norway in a new time-lapse video made from aurora images taken this month. Filmmakers Claus and Anneliese Possberg used about 600 frames to create the video. (Music by Justin Durban, www.justindurban.com) © 2012; Video produced by Dr. Claus & Anneliese Possberg

LET’S TALK ABOUT COLOR

This blog post is about color in art.

Not color on canvas. Color in the Sky. 

I enjoy sharing articles that inform and educate. 

Here’s one that is a reminder of my first experience with an aurora borealis.

I was camping, sleeping outdoors in Montana, and the sky exploded. 

My first thought…being a Chicago born and raised woman…was this the earth coming to an end?

This video shares that experience. 

Now read on and learn about this incredible show of color.  Tell me…

Have you seen an Aurora? Please leave your comments below.

northern lights

WHAT ARE NORTHERN LIGHTS?

The bright dancing lights of the aurora are actually collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth’s atmosphere. The lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. They are known as ‘Aurora borealis’ in the north and ‘Aurora australis’ in the south..
Auroral displays appear in many colours although pale green and pink are the most common. Shades of red, yellow, green, blue, and violet have been reported. The lights appear in many forms from patches or scattered clouds of light to streamers, arcs, rippling curtains or shooting rays that light up the sky with an eerie glow.

WHAT CAUSES THE NORTHERN LIGHTS?

The Northern Lights are actually the result of collisions between gaseous particles in the Earth’s atmosphere with charged particles released from the sun’s atmosphere. Variations in colour are due to the type of gas particles that are colliding. The most common auroral color, a pale yellowish-green, is produced by oxygen molecules located about 60 miles above the earth. Rare, all-red auroras are produced by high-altitude oxygen, at heights of up to 200 miles. Nitrogen produces blue or purplish-red aurora.

The lights of the Aurora generally extend from 80 kilometres (50 miles) to as high as 640 kilometres (400 miles) above the earth’s surface.

WHERE IS THE BEST PLACE TO WATCH THE NORTHERN LIGHTS?

Northern Lights can be seen in the northern or southern hemisphere, in an irregularly shaped oval centred over each magnetic pole. The lights are known as ‘Aurora borealis’ in the north and ‘Aurora australis’ in the south. Scientists have learned that in most instances northern and southern auroras are mirror-like images that occur at the same time, with similar shapes and colors.
Because the phenomena occurs near the magnetic poles, northern lights have been seen as far south as New Orleans in the western hemisphere, while similar locations in the east never experience the mysterious lights. However the best places to watch the lights (in North America) are in the northwestern parts of Canada, particularly the Yukon, Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Alaska. Read More about Northern Lights

More Posts About Color

The Color Green

The Color: Peacock Blue

Previous post:

Next post: